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So far APCSS Editor has created 56 blog entries.

Webinar highlights the Indo-Pacific Region through Hindsight, Insight, and Foresight

By |2020-10-27T15:59:01-10:00October 27th, 2020|Categories: DKI APCSS, news|Tags: , , , , |

The Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (DKI APCSS) hosted a special webinar in September to commemorate our 25th anniversary under the theme -- "Hindsight, Insight, Foresight: Celebrating a Legacy to Educate, Connect and Empower." The webinar titled “Bridging the Past with the Future” was hosted by Dr. Elizabeth Kunce and Dr. John Hemmings.  The event included two panels featuring expert speakers from within the DKI APCSS alumni network and beyond with dialogue that covered the region's collective achievements, current challenges, and imagined future of security in the region across the next 25 years.  The discussions were largely shaped by [...]

Great Power Competition Versus Counterterrorism: A False Dichotomy

By |2020-10-26T14:25:43-10:00October 26th, 2020|Categories: External Publications, news, Mullins|Tags: , |

DKI APCSS professor Dr. Sam Mullins has a new article online called “Great Power Competition Versus Counterterrorism: A False Dichotomy” published by justsecurity.org. In this article, Mullins states than in the “more than two years since the United States officially shifted strategic priorities away from terrorism to focus on great power competition, there is a continued sense of uncertainty as to what exactly this means for counterterrorism. In light of the enduring, and in some cases escalating, terrorist threats across the globe, it is important to get this right.” He further states that “while recognizing the need to end so-called [...]

Partnerships and Soft Power in Space

By |2020-10-22T14:39:15-10:00October 22nd, 2020|Categories: Oehlers, Journal, news|Tags: , , , |

“Partnerships and Soft Power in Space” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Al Oehlers for Security Nexus. This article emphasizes the importance in examining the role of allies and international partners in the newly-formed U.S. Space Force and Space Command’s evolving mission. Excerpt There are valuable gains to be won by reaching out to these many other nations either lacking in space capabilities or with civilian-led space security-related sectors. For example, in a context of strategic competition and aggressive initiatives such as the Belt and Road Space Information Corridor led by the People’s Republic [...]

Measuring Shinzo Abe’s Impact on the Indo-Pacific

By |2020-10-21T16:39:16-10:00October 21st, 2020|Categories: External Publications, news, hemmings|Tags: , , |

Dr. John Hemmings has a new paper published by the East West Center called “Measuring Shinzo Abe’s Impact on the Indo-Pacific.”  In the paper, Hemmings explains that: “Suga – and, indeed, the next generation of future prime ministers – will continue Abe’s legacy in one form or another.” “Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been an incredibly influential figure on the world stage and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will have his work cut out for him,” says Hemmings. “Not only must he uphold and continue the shift in Japan’s grand strategy, he must manage Japan’s famously difficult bureaucracy to do so.” [...]

Is the U.S. Relationship with Australia Detrimental to Strategic Aspirations with Papua New Guinea?

By |2020-10-19T15:55:41-10:00October 19th, 2020|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news|Tags: , , |

“Is the U.S. Relationship with Australia Detrimental to Strategic Aspirations with Papua New Guinea?” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Deon Canyon  and Michael Kabuni for Security Nexus. This article discusses the pitfalls of the U.S. - Australia relationship, and how they relate to Papua New Guinea. Excerpt The United States partnership with Australia is beyond doubt the most significant in Oceania. As a western nation, Australia holds many of the same values as the U.S. and there are extensive economic, diplomatic and military ties that bind the two countries together. There are, however, [...]

Why We Believe: Disinformation, Misinformation, and Neuroscience

By |2020-10-14T14:18:45-10:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Journal, news, Allen|Tags: , , |

“Why We Believe: Disinformation, Misinformation, and Neuroscience” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Ethan Allen for Security Nexus. This article states how disinformation, particularly in social media, may have devastating effects during crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Excerpt Critically, the algorithms that underlie social media platforms exacerbate the different realities that we each see. Social media sites are designed to track what their users each individually see, click on, and listen to, and then to provide them with more information of a similar nature; this is their core, and the basis on which [...]

Religion in a Values-Based Approach to Strategic Competition

By |2020-10-14T12:21:16-10:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Oehlers, Journal, news|Tags: , |

“Religion in a Values-Based Approach to Strategic Competition” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Alfred Oehlers for Security Nexus. This article asks the question “Can we bring religious faiths and beliefs to bear in our strategic competition with our competitors?” Excerpt We speak often of a values-based approach to strategic competition.  In so doing, we usually operate within a mental frame that privileges familiar political and economic values such as those associated with our democratic political systems and practices, and our liberal market-led approaches to economic organization.  Less often do we draw attention to [...]

Perceptions of U.S. Posture in Papua New Guinea

By |2020-10-14T12:13:05-10:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news|Tags: , , |

“Perceptions of U.S. Posture in Papua New Guinea” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Deon Canyon and Michael Kabuni for Security Nexus. This article compares the effects of U.S. posture on the relationship with Papua New Guinea, to that of the People’s Republic of China, along with other influences. Excerpt In Papua New Guinea (PNG), activities by the United States were highly visible in World War II, but have steadily declined ever since. This decay in international relations has been more obvious since the early 2000s when it is contrasted with the rise of [...]

Strategic Competition, National Security and the Need for ‘Competitive Intelligence’

By |2020-10-14T11:37:17-10:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news|Tags: , , |

“Strategic Competition, National Security and the Need for ‘Competitive Intelligence’” is the title of a paper written by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Deon Canyon for Security Nexus. This article illustrates how Competitive intelligence lies at the center of any strategy to maintain political, economic and security posture in the Indo-Pacific region. Excerpt We live in an age in which technology is rapidly transforming every aspect of our lives. Since these advances bestow upon nations considerable advantages, they are coveted and sought after with increasing criminally-motivated avarice. This has increased tensions and competition between the great powers, which forces us to [...]

Pakistan can help win peace in Afghanistan, but only once it’s stable and secure itself

By |2020-10-09T14:51:53-10:00October 9th, 2020|Categories: Tekwani, External Publications, news|Tags: , , |

Shyam Tekwani has a new opinion piece in the South China Morning Post called “Pakistan can help win peace in Afghanistan, but only once it’s stable and secure itself.”  Tekwani discusses Pakistan's roadmap to peace in Afghanistan, its own internal challenges, and the opportunity to build an inclusive and stable society, which is a prerequisite for lasting peace in the region. According to Tekwani,”…no peacemaker’s roadmap can be durable or earnest when it is not inclusive, nor when it applies different norms to the principles of peace and stability at home and aboard.  Neither can it succeed when the mediating [...]

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