Hindsight, Insight, Foresight: Thinking about Security in the Indo-Pacific.

By |2020-10-15T12:22:18-10:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Vuving, Mullins, Sitaraman, hemmings, Miyamoto, Allen, Turvold, news, publication, Wieninger, Tekwani, Watson, Byrd, Minnich, Burgoyne, DKI APCSS|Tags: , , , , |

As part of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies 25th Anniversary, the Center created this publication, “Hindsight, Insight, Foresight: Thinking about Security in the Indo-Pacific,” to highlight important issues in the Indo-Pacific region. This book provides a tour d’horizon of the most consequential issues that are defining the global and regional security landscape in the Indo-Pacific. With hindsight, insight, and foresight in each of its chapters, the book offers a perspective to see this landscape in its dynamic making and re-making. Download the Digital Book Edited by Dr. Alexander L. Vuving, [...]

COVID-19 Healthcare Workers: 70% are Women

By |2020-05-13T11:42:17-10:00May 13th, 2020|Categories: Faculty Articles, Journal, Miyamoto|Tags: , , , |

“COVID-19 Healthcare Workers: 70% are Women” is a new paper authored by Dr. Inez Miyamoto for Security Nexus. In this paper, Dr. Miyamoto highlights the need for research to understand the challenges healthcare workers face from a gendered perspective to better respond to pandemics. Excerpt: “Healthcare workers are suffering from elevated stress levels not only from exhaustion and loss of life, but from also having to make painful, ethical decisions on patient care in an environment of constant shortages. In a study of healthcare workers in China, more women experienced more severe symptoms of depression, anxiety, and distrust than did men." [...]

Mass Surveillance and Individual Privacy

By |2020-03-30T16:23:32-10:00March 30th, 2020|Categories: Faculty Articles, Journal, Miyamoto|Tags: , |

Dr. Inez Miyamoto shared her perspectives on “Mass Surveillance And Individual Privacy” for DKI APCSS’ Security Nexus. Here is an excerpt from the article: During a crisis, governments will seek to implement technological solutions in an effort be responsive. The COVID-19 pandemic is no exception—in order to contain the spread of an outbreak and to assist with contact tracing, governments are using technologies, such as facial recognition, surveillance cameras with artificial intelligence, and mobile phone apps. The use of technological solutions, however, comes at a cost to individual privacy. View full article

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