Rebalance U.S. Coast Guard Cutters to Help Advance a ‘Free and Open’ Indo-Pacific

By |2021-05-13T15:23:05-10:00May 13th, 2021|Categories: Journal, news, Moyseowicz|Tags: , , , |

“Rebalance U.S. Coast Guard Cutters to Help Advance a ‘Free and Open’ Indo-Pacific,” is the title of a paper by Lt. Cmdr. Mike Moyseowicz for Security Nexus. This article analyzes the distribution of United States Coast Guard assets around the world and the need to reexamine the distribution to better serve a “free and open” Indo-Pacific. Summary: As a federal maritime law enforcement agency, the U.S. Coast Guard works to counter maritime security threats, promote a rules-based international order in the maritime domain, uphold respect for sovereignty, and ensure the freedom of the seas. With missions ranging across the vast [...]

India Leading International HADR Cooperation in South Asia

By |2021-05-07T14:31:16-10:00May 11th, 2021|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news|Tags: , , |

“India Leading International HADR Cooperation in South Asia,” is the title of a paper by Dr. Deon Canyon for Security Nexus. This article emphasizes the need for India to continue developing more robust internal processes, improve inter-agency and inter-ministry cooperation, and engage more holistically with stakeholders, including civil society, as a provider in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. Summary Fueled by stable economic growth, India is stepping up as a provider of international humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in South Asia and beyond. This includes supporting multilateral endeavors, resourcing and innovating sub-regional efforts, and continuing to expand bilateral engagements. As [...]

SARS-COV-2 Mutations, Variants, and National Security

By |2021-05-07T14:14:39-10:00May 8th, 2021|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news, kevany|Tags: , , , , , |

“SARS-COV-2 Mutations, Variants, and National Security,” is the title of a paper by Dr. Deon Canyon, Dr. Sebastian Kevany and retired Rear Adm. Michael S. Baker for Security Nexus. This article explains how COVID-19 mutations emerge, and how governments would be potentially remiss in turning away from health security protocols and issues, including funding for variant testing, even after the acute phase of the global pandemic is over. Summary Placing a priority on the surveillance of Covid mutations by investing in genomic sequencing is vital to ensuring a forward leaning posture and a proactive response to dangerous new variants. More [...]

An International Public Health and Virus Surveillance Network for National Security

By |2021-05-07T14:35:32-10:00May 7th, 2021|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news, kevany|Tags: , , , |

“An International Public Health and Virus Surveillance Network for National Security,” is the title of a paper by Dr. Deon Canyon, Dr. Sebastian Kevany and retired Rear Adm. Michael S. Baker for Security Nexus. This article highlights the necessity for the United States to increase national sequence-based surveillance and provide more support for the public health infrastructure to gain control of COVID-19 variants. Summary Infectious diseases continue to evolve and disrupt nations around the globe. Placing a priority on the surveillance of Covid mutations by investing in routine genomic sequencing is vital to ensuring a forward-leaning posture and a proactive [...]

The Joint Recovery of Fallen Soldiers from the Korean War: One Way for American, Chinese, North and South Korean Soldiers to Cooperate and Reconcile

By |2021-04-26T13:28:02-10:00April 26th, 2021|Categories: Journal, news, Cho|Tags: , , , |

“The Joint Recovery of Fallen Soldiers from the Korean War: One Way for American, Chinese, North and South Korean Soldiers to Cooperate and Reconcile,” is the title of a paper by Dr. Sungmin Cho for Security Nexus. This article recommends a cooperative solution to easing tensions on the Korean Peninsula. Summary For a new approach to break through the diplomatic stalemate on the Korean Peninsula, this paper makes a policy recommendation to launch a joint recovery project calling for soldiers from the U.S., China, North and South Korea to work together on recovering the remains of their predecessors who died [...]

The Sino-Russian Approach to the Maritime: A Mare Clausem System?

By |2021-04-02T10:37:18-10:00March 31st, 2021|Categories: Journal, news, hemmings|Tags: , , |

“The Sino-Russian Approach to the Maritime: A Mare Clausem System?” is the title of a paper by Dr. John Hemmings for Security Nexus. This article highlights how the increase in resources and focus gives US forces the ability to push back and fight in the information domain, a space where Russia and China are increasing the tempo. Abstract: The current global order is based on the free and open maritime trading order, giving access to all seafaring nations. The "openness" of this order, concepts such as "international waters" were not inevitable and there are historical instances of states - such [...]

Anti-Vaccine Sentiment – an Existential Disrupter of National and International Security

By |2021-03-31T15:17:39-10:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news, kevany|Tags: , , |

“Anti-Vaccine Sentiment - an Existential Disrupter of National and International Security” is the title of a paper by Drs. Deon Canyon and Sebastian Kevany for Security Nexus. This paper suggests that taking a harder line against “anti-vaxxers” while balancing personal rights of individuals may be a solution in flattening the COVID-19 curve. Summary Vaccines brought many benefits and advances to the global community, but their production, dissemination and use have never been exceptional for a variety of reasons. The existential threat to individuals, communities and even national security posed by SARS-CoV-2 and its expected continuation in our world make it [...]

Looking Forward: Pandemic, Economic, Vaccine and Social Predictions for ‘Year Two’

By |2021-03-25T14:42:08-10:00March 25th, 2021|Categories: Canyon, Journal, news, kevany|Tags: , |

“Looking Forward: Pandemic, Economic, Vaccine and Social Predictions for ‘Year Two’” is the title of a paper by Drs. Sebastian Kevany and Deon Canyon for Security Nexus. This paper attempts to provide predictions and advice for policymakers as we enter year two of the COVID pandemic. Summary:  Over a year in to the global pandemic, demand for prognoses and models that will assist in determining key decisions and planning remains as strong as ever – resulting in entire industries that provide forecasts, foresight and insight into possible future outcomes. This demand is in spite of the numerous failures of scientists, [...]

Strategic Competition, Cooperation, and Accommodation: Perspectives from the Indian Ocean Region

By |2021-03-23T08:17:21-10:00March 23rd, 2021|Categories: Faculty, Workshop, Yamin, External Publications, news|Tags: , |

“Strategic Competition, Cooperation, and Accommodation: Perspectives from the Indian Ocean Region,” is the title of a paper by Dr. Saira Yamin, Maj. Daniel Cedillo, Lt. Col. Nicholas Sikes, Dr. Srini Sitaraman and Lt. Cmdr. Keith Wilkins for Security Nexus. This article highlights the diversity of perspectives on strategic competition and opportunities for cooperation in the Indian Ocean Region drawing on discussions at the three-day virtual workshop organized by DKI APCSS. Summary This article draws on conversations facilitated at the virtual Indian Ocean Region Workshop convened by the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (DKI APCSS) in Honolulu, Hawaii, [...]

The Impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

By |2021-03-22T11:30:17-10:00March 22nd, 2021|Categories: Faculty, External Publications, news, Mullins|Tags: , , |

Dr. Sam Mullins has a new article on “The Impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism:  Reassessing the Evidence” recently published by the European Institute of CT and Conflict Prevention in their  EICTP Research Study: Key Determinants in the Era of COVID-19 and Beyond. Trajectory, Disruption and the Way Forward. Volume II. According to Mullins, “public commentary on this issue has generally suffered from failing to give due consideration to conflicting information; ignoring existing, long-term trends and alternative, explanatory factors; conflating correlation with causation; relying too heavily on theoretically-driven inferences and making assumptions beyond the available data.” Read [...]

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