Assoc. Prof. Lumbaca publishes an article on the changing landscape of terrorism

By |2019-04-23T09:10:56-10:00April 19th, 2019|Categories: College, External Publications, Faculty, Independent Faculty Articles, Lumbaca|Tags: , , |

DKI APCSS Associate Professor Lt. Col. J. “Lumpy” Lumbaca published an article in Small Wars Journal recently entitled “Indo-Pacific Terrorism: What to expect for the foreseeable future.” The article addresses the influence of the Islamic State on terrorists, the effective use of technologies to increase the sophistication in terror attacks and a multitude of other factors that have changed the terrorist landscape in the past two decades. Excerpt: The advancements here are more about hardware, tactics, techniques, and procedures used by terrorists to make attacks more deadly.  The May 2018 Islamic State-linked Jamaah Ansharut Daulah suicide bombings in Surabaya demonstrated the [...]

DKI APCSS Professor has OpEd on N. Korea in latest The Diplomat magazine

By |2019-05-15T14:02:33-10:00March 6th, 2019|Categories: External Publications, Independent Faculty Articles, Vuving|Tags: , , , |

Dr Alexander L. Vuving has a new article in The Diplomat on the second North Korea-US Summit and the options for the two countries going forward. The OpEd entitled “The Future of the Trump-Kim Summit” explains why the Summit was ended without an agreement as well as what’s next for the countries. According to Vuving, “One obvious reason for the breakdown of the summit is its process. It left too much of a gap for the top leaders to close in too little time. But Trump and Kim could have saved the summit by picking “low-hanging fruits.” Part of the package [...]

OpEd: ASEAN and Cyber

By |2018-11-14T10:37:23-10:00May 7th, 2018|Categories: College, Faculty, Independent Faculty Articles, Noor, Opinions/Editorials|

by Elina Noor, Assoc. Prof., DKI APCSS On the same day that Kim Jong Un stepped over the demarcation line at Panmunjom to shake the hand of a smiling Moon Jae-in, the 32nd ASEAN Summit released three forward-looking outcome documents focused on the future of Southeast Asia:  the ASEAN Leaders’ Vision for a Resilient and Innovative ASEAN; Concept Note for an ASEAN Smart Cities Network; and the ASEAN Leaders’ Statement on Cybersecurity Cooperation. These were understandably overshadowed by the historic inter-Korean summit but the success and efficacy of ASEAN meetings and statements have also largely come to be judged by [...]

The Security Risks of Rising Inequality

By |2019-01-15T13:18:49-10:00April 11th, 2018|Categories: Byrd, College, Faculty, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Opinions/Editorials|

Dr. Miemie Winn Byrd, a professor at DKI APCSS, has written an analytical report entitled "The Security Risks of Rising Inequality," about the rising effects of income equality. Excerpt: When a condition of disparity, inequality, and exclusion is perceived as being the result of persistent unfairness and injustice, it can invoke a powerful tide of human basic instinct. Click here for the full report Dr. Miemie Winn Byrd is a Professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official [...]

Dr. Malik examines growing rivalry in the Indian Ocean with new article

By |2018-04-13T10:38:41-10:00March 16th, 2018|Categories: College, External Publications, Faculty, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Malik, Opinions/Editorials|

Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies' professor Dr. Mohan Malik published an article on the Macdonald-Laurier Institute website which highlights the growing rivalry between India and China in the Indian Ocean, resulting in crisis in the Maldives. The article is entitled "The China-India Nautical Games in the Indian Ocean" and was published in two parts. Excerpt: “For small states, economic engagement with China has strategic consequences. Electoral politics provides Beijing with the opportunity to court and bribe politicians of fragile democracies along the Belt and Road to gain an advantageous position for itself over its competitors. In fact, China’s investments [...]

OpEd on US Options with N. Korea

By |2018-01-04T13:28:24-10:00January 4th, 2018|Categories: College, Faculty, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Opinions/Editorials, Wieninger|

Dr. Bill Wieninger recently co-authored an OpEd on N. Korea for Time magazine with Rep. Ted Lieu entitled: “President Trump's Threats Against North Korea Put the World in Danger.” The OpEd was published in the Ideas section of Time magazine’s website. In the OpEd, the authors recommend a peaceful solution and points to historical examples of South Africa’s denuclearization as well as the US’s efforts to open relations with China during the Nixon administration. Read the full OpEd online at: http://time.com/5085997/north-korea-donald-trump-war/ The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or [...]

DKI APCSS Professor Recommends how to Discuss Maritime Freedom Effectively

By |2018-10-19T16:24:39-10:00December 21st, 2017|Categories: College, External Publications, Faculty, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Odom|

In contemporary international discourse about maritime freedom (e.g., “freedom of navigation”), representatives of nations often speak in generalities, but rarely clarify what they mean. The result is a risk of maritime freedom becoming a relatively meaningless concept and nations misunderstanding one another when discussing this concept in international relations. What can be done to reduce this risk? Professor Jonathan G. Odom, a military professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, has a published a new article in the Ocean Development and International Law Journal, entitled “Navigating Between Treaties and Tweets: How to Ensure Discourse about Maritime Freedom [...]

Prof. Benjamin Ryan co-authors new paper on reducing mortality from non-communicable diseases post disaster

By |2019-04-01T15:28:08-10:00October 24th, 2017|Categories: College, External Publications, Faculty, Independent Faculty Articles, Ryan|

DKI APCSS associate professor Benjamin J. Ryan co-authored a new paper entitled: “Ranking and prioritizing strategies for reducing mortality and morbidity from noncommunicable diseases post disaster: An Australian perspective.”  The paper appears in the latest International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.  Other authors are Richard C. Franklin, Frederick M. Burkle, Erin C. Smith, Peter Aitken, Kerrianne Watt, and Pter A. Leggat. ABSTRACT: “The increasing noncommunicable disease burden and frequency of natural disasters across the world has created an immediate need to implement strategies for reducing the risk of indirect mortality and morbidity post disaster. People at greatest risk of their condition [...]

OpEd: Tracking Malaysia’s Force Build-up in the South China Sea

By |2017-10-18T11:13:11-10:00October 18th, 2017|Categories: College, Faculty, Independent Faculty Articles, Opinions/Editorials, Vuving|

Dr. Alex Vuving has a new opinion piece entitled "Tracking Malaysia’s Force Build-up in the South China Sea," on cogitASIA, a blog of the CSIS Asia Program. Here's an excerpt from that article: The declining trend in Malaysia’s defense outlay was halted in 2013. That year, Malaysia was shocked when China staged a naval exercise around James Shoal, a 72-foot deep underwater bank lying 55 nautical miles (nm) off the Malaysian Borneo coast. It was also in 2013 that China Coast Guard ships started to anchor at South Luconia Shoal, an oil-rich area lying 70 nm off Borneo. Each of Malaysia’s [...]

OpEd: Force Buildup in the South China Sea: The Myth of an Arms Race

By |2017-10-13T14:14:52-10:00October 13th, 2017|Categories: Courses, External Publications, Faculty, Independent Faculty Articles, Vuving|

Dr. Alex Vuving has a new opinion piece entitled "Force Buildup in the South China Sea: The Myth of an Arms Race" on cogitASIA, a blog of the CSIS Asia Program. Here's an excerpt from the article: "If an arms race is an attempt to equal or surpass one’s competitor, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam are not playing catch-up with China, nor with one another. These three major Southeast Asian claimants in the South China Sea have little intention of achieving military parity or superiority. Instead, their long-term ambition is what can be called “minimal deterrence.” They want to build just [...]