OpEd: Tracking Malaysia’s Force Build-up in the South China Sea

By |2017-10-18T11:13:11-10:00October 18th, 2017|Categories: Faculty, College, Vuving, Opinions/Editorials, Independent Faculty Articles|

Dr. Alex Vuving has a new opinion piece entitled "Tracking Malaysia’s Force Build-up in the South China Sea," on cogitASIA, a blog of the CSIS Asia Program. Here's an excerpt from that article: The declining trend in Malaysia’s defense outlay was halted in 2013. That year, Malaysia was shocked when China staged a naval exercise around James Shoal, a 72-foot deep underwater bank lying 55 nautical miles (nm) off the Malaysian Borneo coast. It was also in 2013 that China Coast Guard ships started to anchor at South Luconia Shoal, an oil-rich area lying 70 nm off Borneo. Each of Malaysia’s [...]

OpEd: Force Buildup in the South China Sea: The Myth of an Arms Race

By |2017-10-13T14:14:52-10:00October 13th, 2017|Categories: Courses, Faculty, Vuving, Independent Faculty Articles, External Publications|

Dr. Alex Vuving has a new opinion piece entitled "Force Buildup in the South China Sea: The Myth of an Arms Race" on cogitASIA, a blog of the CSIS Asia Program. Here's an excerpt from the article: "If an arms race is an attempt to equal or surpass one’s competitor, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam are not playing catch-up with China, nor with one another. These three major Southeast Asian claimants in the South China Sea have little intention of achieving military parity or superiority. Instead, their long-term ambition is what can be called “minimal deterrence.” They want to build just [...]

New paper on women’s role in disaster management and its implications for national security

By |2020-03-10T11:03:57-10:00July 11th, 2017|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Ear, Independent Faculty Articles, Women Peace and Security, Analytical|Tags: |

Why women in Asia-Pacific countries are more susceptible to disaster impacts?  This topic is explored in a new paper by DKI APCSS professor Jessica Ear on “Women’s Role in Disaster Management and Implications for National Security.” Her paper examines societal roles that create greater susceptibility to disaster impacts and case studies where the inclusion of women in disaster management is reducing these impacts on the most vulnerable portions of society. According to Ear: “ In order to promote the advancement of women in these key security areas, the issues of women’s risks not just in disaster vulnerable situations but also [...]

New paper on ‘The Land Component Role in Maritime Security’ released

By |2016-12-20T15:27:43-10:00December 20th, 2016|Categories: Faculty, College, Independent Faculty Articles|

“The Land Component Role in Maritime Security” is the latest analytical report by DKI APCSS professor Army Lt. Col. Daniel Kent.  The report is available here. The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. -END-

Forecasted Impact of Climate Change on Infectious Disease and Health Security in Hawaii by 2050

By |2016-09-06T10:56:28-10:00September 6th, 2016|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Canyon|

Dr. Deon Canyon co-authored an article titled “Forecasted Impact of Climate Change on Infectious Disease and Health Security in  Hawaii by 2050,” published by the  Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness journal.  Canyon and coauthors Rick Speare and Frederick Burke, discuss the potential impacts of climate change on the study of infectious and vector-borne diseases in Hawaii.  They consider scenarios based on the anticipated effects of higher average temperatures and weather extremes on disease distribution.  Their conclusions recommend a resilience model to increase adaptive capacity for all climate change impacts rather than one focused specifically on communicable diseases. The views in [...]

Fait Accompli

By |2016-06-01T13:27:53-10:00June 1st, 2016|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, jackson|

Dr. Van Jackson has a new article called “Grappling with the Fait Accompli: A Classical Tactic in the Modern Strategic Landscape” which appeared this week on the War on the Rocks blog. In his article, Jackson describes variations in the fait accompli, an age-old tactic to challenge the status quo and secure unilateral gains while minimizing the risks of war. He ties this concept to the international security environment, identifying the fait accompli tactic in Russian annexation of Crimea, North Korea’s recurring violence, and China’s contentious artificial island-building in the South China Sea. According to Jackson: “Risks notwithstanding, the fait accompli [...]

New Paper on ‘Shifting Geo-politics in the Greater South Asia Region’

By |2016-04-12T17:44:46-10:00April 12th, 2016|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Snedden|

“Shifting Geo-politics in the Greater South Asia Region” is the latest analytical report by DKI APCSS professor Dr. Christopher Snedden. The report serves as a primer on the greater South Asia region which is home to 1.7 billion people.  According to Snedden, this is a region of challenges and possibilities.  The report covers important historic events, economic achievements, interactions with each other and with the U.S. and China, as well as future trends and possibilities. While fractious, one of the biggest challenges and opportunities is to develop South Asia into a strong, economically-unified region. To achieve this, states Snedden, “the nations [...]

DKI APCSS professor paper on airspace defense published by international law review

By |2015-10-19T17:10:37-10:00October 19th, 2015|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Odom|

Cmdr. Jonathan G. Odom was recently published in the October issue of Revue Belge De Droit International (Belgian Review of International Law), volume 2014/1 is now online.   His article on “A `Rules-Based Approach' to Airspace Defense: A U.S. Perspective on the International Law of the Sea and Airspace, Air Defense Measures, and the Freedom of Navigation" is based on a presentation he made at a conference last year at the University of Ghent. Abstract: In light of recent international developments, such as the People's Republic of China's declaration of an air defense identification zone (ADIZ) in the East China Sea and [...]

Communication and Strategy Development

By |2018-06-26T13:32:47-10:00February 5th, 2015|Categories: Faculty, College, Faculty Articles, Independent Faculty Articles, Finley|

“Strategy and communication are an integral whole — best practiced as art, not science,” by Herman F. Finley, in his new paper, Communication and Strategy Development. “The strategist, as artist, uses principles not checklists, intuition more than rules, to collaboratively shape a better future in a world composed of interconnected complex adaptive systems.” This article is the companion piece to a broader strategy development essay to be written by Finley, an associate professor, who lectures on information technology, strategic communications and complexity at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. According to Finley, “A first step in understanding the linkages between communication and strategy [...]

Why North Korea Won’t Follow Myanmar’s Path to Reform – Dr. Miemie Winn Byrd

By |2017-03-09T13:16:03-10:00January 7th, 2015|Categories: Courses, Faculty, Kim, Independent Faculty Articles, External Publications, Byrd|

Dr. Steven Kim Dr. Steven Kim and Dr. Miemie Winn Byrd recently collaborated on an article discussing whether North Korea would follow Myanmar in adopting institutional reforms. Their article "Worlds Apart: Why North Korea Won't Follow Myanmar's Path to Reform," which appears in the 2014 Winter edition of Global Asia, compares the two countries in terms of the factors affecting their decision regarding reform. In the article they state: "The reason that reforms in Myanmar have raised such high expectations for North Korea is the perceived similarities of the two regimes. As with North Korea today, under military control [...]

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