APCSS Faculty

AUKUS Is a Short-Term Mess but a Long-Term Win for Australia

By |2021-10-12T21:38:32-10:00October 12th, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, Vuving, External Publications, news|Tags: , |

Dr. Alexander Vuving has a new article in Foreign Policy magazine entitled “AUKUS Is a Short-Term Mess but a Long-Term Win for Australia.” The article discusses the impact of the Australian-UK-US pact on Australia. According to Vuving, although the immediate impact may have been controversial, he states that this puts Australia on the right side of history. “The great-power rivalry between the United States and China is the more fundamental struggle between a rules-based and a hierarchy-based international order,” said Vuving. He concluded that “Australia is fortunate not to have a dilemma between the best choice based on the values [...]

Michael C. Long

By |2021-10-07T17:13:16-10:00October 7th, 2021|Tags: , , |

Captain Michael Long joined the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in July 2021 as a military faculty member. He was Commander of Sector Honolulu where he led Coast Guard missions throughout the Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa. CAPT Long’s other operational assignments include Deputy Commander of Sector Miami, Senior Defense Official / Defense Attaché at the US Embassy to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, Response Department Head and Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator at Sector Puget Sound, Port Operations at Marine Safety Office New Orleans, and Assistant Operations Officer at the Gulf Strike Team. His staff tours include serving [...]

W. Brent Christensen

By |2021-10-06T16:55:52-10:00October 6th, 2021|Tags: , , |

Dr. W. Brent Christensen joined the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) in September 2021.  This is the second time he has served in this role at APCSS, where he served previously 2015-17. Dr. Christensen has been in the U.S. Foreign Service for over 30 years and most recently served as the Director of the American Institute in Taiwan 2018-21.  He was Deputy Director of the American Institute in Taiwan 2012-15.  Prior to that, he was Director of the State Department’s Office of Taiwan Coordination.  He has served three assignments at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, the most [...]

Canada Can Do Much More With Its Five Eyes Allies To Respond To China And Russia’s Global Threats

By |2021-09-30T08:07:28-10:00September 30th, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, External Publications, news, hemmings|Tags: , , |

OTTAWA, ON (September 30, 2021): The international environment is increasingly insecure. Under the leadership of Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin, China and Russia are attempting to reshape the international system and constrain the liberal democratic West. State competition is changing, in a shift towards deniable, intrusive, and non-military threats against all sectors of society and, as a result, liberal democracies are increasingly looking for collective ways to respond. To meet this growing global challenge, Canada could do much more with the historic Five Eyes grouping that also includes the US, UK, Australia and New Zealand. The Five Eyes began primarily as an intelligence-sharing [...]

Why did China engage with Western democracy promotion programs?

By |2021-09-10T11:38:40-10:00September 10th, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, External Publications, news, Cho|Tags: , , |

Professor Sungmin Cho’s latest peer-reviewed article entitled “Why Non-Democracy Engages with Western Democracy-Promotion Programs: The China Model,” was recently published by World Politics. Abstract “Between the mid-1990s and the mid-2010s, the Chinese government was distinctly open to the Western offer of democracy-assistance programs. It cooperated with a number of Western organizations to improve the rule of law, village elections, administrative capacity, and civil society in China. Why did the Chinese government engage with democracy promoters who tried to develop these democratic attributes within China? The author argues that the government intended to use Western aid to its advantage. The Chinese [...]

Women on the Front Lines in Myanmar’s Fight for Democracy

By |2021-09-10T10:38:53-10:00September 10th, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, External Publications, Byrd, news|Tags: , |

Dr. Miemie Byrd’s latest article “Women on the Front Lines in Myanmar’s Fight for Democracy,” was published by the Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs, on Aug. 26. In this article, Byrd illustrates how the coup staged in Myanmar led to a brutal military crackdown, particularly against women. She states “The very first fatality of the military’s ruthless suppression was a 19-year-old woman named Mya Thwet Khine. A sniper fatally shot her in the head while she participated in a rally near Nay Pyi Taw, the country’s capital city. Since her death, many more female protesters have been killed, arrested, and assaulted [...]

Kristina L. Richardson

By |2021-09-08T17:11:44-10:00September 8th, 2021|Tags: , , , |

Colonel Kristina L. Richardson joined the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security in July 2021 as a Senior Service College Military Fellow.  A native of Southern California, Col.Richardson entered the Army in 1995 as a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point.  She graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1999, making her the first in her family to graduate from college and commission into the Army. Col. Richardson has served most of her Army career as a combat helicopter pilot flying the UH60 Blackhawk and UH72 Lakota helicopters.  She transitioned later in her [...]

Will Vietnam Be America’s Next Strategic Partner?

By |2021-08-20T10:58:48-10:00August 20th, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, Vuving, External Publications, news|Tags: , |

Dr. Alexander Vuving’s latest article is “Will Vietnam Be America’s Next Strategic Partner?” published by The Diplomat. In the article Vuving states that “Times of trouble are often times of truth. The COVID-19 pandemic has provided an opportunity for people to signal their true commitment to friends. To get a sense of how close countries are in geopolitical terms and how warm their relationships are, one can simply count the number of high-level visits or the amount of COVID-19 vaccines donated between them.” He goes on to say that “The relationship between Washington and Hanoi is one of the most delicate [...]

Jared T. Corsi

By |2021-08-11T13:53:46-10:00August 11th, 2021|Tags: |

Lieutenant Colonel Jared Corsi joined the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in 2021 as a military fellow.  He brings a diverse blend of academic and military experiences to the center, including Defense Support of Civil Authorities, engineering and construction, project management, energy and environmental management, political-military affairs, public-private partnerships, national security, strategic planning, leadership, and workplace conflict resolution. He has a strong desire to help others realize their full potential and live happy, fulfilling lives. Lt. Col. Corsi holds an M.A. in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College; an M.S. in [...]

Modernizing US Alliance for Maritime Security in the Indo-Pacific

By |2021-08-02T14:57:29-10:00August 2nd, 2021|Categories: Faculty Articles, Watson, External Publications, news|Tags: , , |

Dr. Virginia Bacay Watson has written a chapter on “Modernizing U.S. Alliances for Maritime Security in the Indo-Pacific” for a new Pacific Forum publication, Issues & Insights Vol. 21, SR 2 — Advancing a Rules-based Maritime Order in the Indo-Pacific, which is now available online. In an excerpt from her chapter, Watson states that: “The U.S. alliance system was a post-World War II ‘strategic innovation’ credited with successfully protecting U.S. global and national interests for over seven decades. Today, however, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the hub-and-spokes system in Asia have lost their edge and are struggling to [...]

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